About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
MSNBC 15
FOXNEWS 10
CNN 9
CNNW 8
MSNBCW 7
CSPAN 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WRC 1
LANGUAGE
English 54
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
't miss that. >>> remember when osama bin laden was found and killed in pakistan? the united states government and lots of americans suspicious that the pakistani government knew he was there the entire time. today, payback. the checkbook is closed. >>> also, a fan falls to his death while trying to catch a baseball. his young son watches it happen. tonight, new information about the steps being taken at the stadium where he died to prevent another tragedy. and a pro sports hall-of-famer weighs in on stadium dangers. if you want information about the stories we are covering, want to offer us some to cover, reach out through twitter, facebook, cnn.com/don and on foursquare.com as well. [ female announcer ] now at red lobster a complete four course seafood feast for $15. start with soup then have salad and biscuits followed by 1 of 7 delicious entrees and finish with something sweet all for just $15. right now at red lobster. all for j♪ $15. ♪ ♪ ♪ introducing purina one beyond a new food for your cat or dog. ♪ you are my sunshine ♪ my only sunshine ♪ you makes me happy
in afghanistan, iraq and pakistan. while there is no immediate claim of responsibility, the u.s. officials say a handful of networks including an indian terrorist group may be behind the bombing. a senator with an intelligence background says the indian mujahadeen who want them to dominate the indian way of life is suspect. but they say the group is poorly organize and possibly had outside help, possibly from pakistani intelligence. >> with a dramatic attack like this, coordinated over three locations, it took money and it took planning. that always raises the speckor of the isi in pakistan. >> the three explosions at the mumbai opera house, jewelry district and major commuter hub drew comparisons to the mumbai attack in 2008. the ram pain that lasted for 60 hours killing 166 people was low-tech. it relied on ten pakistani militants armed with cell phone, handguns and back packs filled with explosives. the group l.e.t. linked to pakistani intelligence was blamed. >> the obvious question: is pakistan involved? i cannot think of any conceivable reason why pakistan would want to provoke a crisis
to cnnmoney.com. now, watch this. >> many here in pakistan are seeing this latest move by the obama administration as disrespectful, as the u.s. not appreciating efforts by pakistan. >> the united states sending a strong message to pakistan. do your job better or no money. now pakistan firing back with a message all of its own, that's next. plus, just when we thought this whole uk tabloid hacking scandal is over. no. no -- news today, it's about to get a whole lot worse. back in a moment. miles per gallon on the highway. how does it do that? well, to get there, a lot of complicated engineering goes into every one. like variable valve timing and turbocharging, active front grille shutters that close at high speeds, and friction reducing -- oh, man, that is complicated. how about this -- cruze eco offers 42 miles per gallon. cool? ♪ when an investment lacks discipline, it's never this obvious. introducing investment discipline etfs from russell. visit russelletfs.com r a prospectus, containing the investment objectives, risks, charges, expenses and other information. read and consid
make the u.s. -pakistan relations rockier. but first we get the latest to debt crisis back and forth from a gang member -- gap of six member, rather. senator mike crapo. my cream is what makes stouffer's fettuccini alfredo so delicious. i think you'll find it's the vegetables. deliciously rich. flavorful! [ female announcer ] together at last. introducing new stouffer's farmers' harvest with sides of lightly sauteed farm-picked vegetables. find more ways to get to the table at letsfixdinner.com. is non-stop to seattle? just carry new preparation h totables. discreet, little tubes packed with big relief. from the brand doctors recommend most by name. new preparation h totables. the anywhere preparation h. >> bret: members of the so-called bipartisan gang of six today stood before a group of their fellow senators briefing them on the work they've done so far toward a debt deal. idaho senator mike crapo is one of them. he joins us here in studio. good evening, senator. >> good evening. >> bret: let's start first of all with a broad overview and the reaction to it on capitol hill today.
of the sanctuary across the border in pakistan. >> until the problem of insurgent and terror sanctuary in pakistan is effectively addressed and that can be addressed through military means. it can be addressed through political means or a combinations there of which is very much of our approach. until that problem has been satisfactorily addressed, then our enterprise in afghanistan and the long-term stability of afghanistan remains at risk. they look across the border into pakistan and see sanctuary there. they see enemy capability there. they see enemy leaders that are there that are not being hit right now. so their question is, why do we need 100,000 american troops inside of afghanistan when we know that a very big part of this problem sits inside of pakistan? >> reporter: a grim reality right there from the ambassador as he leaves afghanistan where he says that he will leave a part of his heart behind. chuck? >> all right. atia in kabul. thanks very much. >> those u.s. drone attacks in afghanistan have killed 45 militants in the last 24 hours. it comes a day after washington announced it wou
.s. cutting the pursestrings to pakistan. we'll get reaction from senator bob casey. . and we expect to hear from house speaker john boehner just moments from now on the debt talks. we'll bring those comments to you live when they happen. you're watching "andrea mitchell reports.". there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. [ male announcer ] the davis twins... ...are alike in nearly every way... ...right down to brushing their teeth. so how did only one get gingivitis? well, one in two people do. so i told karen about new crest pro-health clinical gum protection toothpaste. it helps eliminate plaque at the gumline, helping prevent gingivitis. it's even clinically proven to help reverse it in just 4 weeks. and it protects these other areas dentists check most. looks like the twins are even aga
data move fearlessly through the clouds means more than ever. >>> pakistan is detaining a doctor suspected of working with the cia in an elaborate ruse. it was reportedly designed to get dna samples from people inside the compound where it turned out osama bin laden was living. joining us now from islamabad, resa saya. walk us through what happened here. this is a pretty intriguing spy story, if you will. what happened? >> reporter: yeah, it's a fascinating glimpse, look, at the lengths the cia was going to find the location of bin laden in abbottabad. a pakistani security official is telling us the pakistani doctor is in custody suspected of helping the cia set up an intricate plot to confirm the whereabouts of osama bin laden. according to this official he set up a free vaccination campaign to offer a free vaccination to the people of abbottabad where bin laden's compound was located. this doctor hired two nurses going around town from house to house, the plan towas to find t bin laden kids, to match their dna with the dna of bin laudedl sister who passed away in massachuset ma
panetta visited in afghanistan. he failed to visit pakistan. what do you think that says about the tension? >> the tension is quite high. frankly unless there is some reversal and lowering of the rhetoric, then i think it's going to spin in a very deep decline. that's not something that's in pakistan's interest on the united states. you need to keep conversations as private as possible sending very strong messages but if we continue to vent our frustrations mutual frustrations ours with the pakistanis and what they have done and fail to do theirs with us in terms of us trying to micro manage what they're doing, then your going to have a break or breach in that relationship. pakistan is a major non-nato ally. allies don't allow things to happen like the hosting of the con sealing of bin laden or the arresting of those who help take bin laden down or allegedly the targeting for assassination of a journalist who's been critical of the regime. these are not the acts of allies. we've got to get back to a level of respect and trust i think that's lacking right now. as a result the relationship i
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
, to look beyond just india, pakistan, afghanistan. and i think, you know, it's the right way to approach it. it wasn't too explicit, but it was a way of nudging them, saying, come on, guys, you've got to keep an eye on what's going on in asia right now. >> let's explore deeper. let's stay on the china part. you note she has to be careful, but she was also pretty obvious. she was talking about india's democracy and growing economy, and india can, quote, inspire others to follow a similar path of openness and tolerance. it's not hard to guess what she's talking about openness and tolerance, who is she talking about there? >> look, i think that this is a grand tradition of american diplomacy which is when we want to have a strategic relationship with china, we want to have a cooperative relationship with china but we do have our preferences and we've always said, every president, democrat and republican, for 30, 40 years, that, you know, when compared with dictatorships and closed systems, we prefer democracies and open systems. and so we're trying to make that association and make it plain. y
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
pakistan, as we said on the show a number of times. how do we deal with pakistan and at the same time, get out of afghanistan except in terms of special forces or drones to represent our interest and chase down terrorists? meanwhile, you have the greatest tender box in the world, to save a nuclear pakistan with more than 100, probably twice as many with nuclear warheads that can fall into the hands of terrorists. >> the bottom line is, how do we deal with it? >> it's always pakistan is a basket case, a nuclear basket case. stay in afghanistan. >> you don't. you don't. >> it's not going to work. that is washington's argument, mike barnicle. pakistan is stabilized. we have to keep having american troops killed in afghanistan. it doesn't add up. invading cambodia is the right move when you are going into vietnam. >> continuing argument and keep making it because less than 1% of american families and american people are serving in the military in afghanistan. >> there you go. >> back to the draft. >> untouched. >> we need a draft. >> we'll come back the dr. aidan quinn. [ male announcer ] memb
. >> sunny hostin, thanks for weighing in. >> thanks. >>> building anything in afghanistan and pakistan is a challenge. building orphanage is miraculous. this woman is giving hundreds of orphans a home and hope. you had a chance to interview the lady. how did she get out? >> it's a remarkable story. she is only 20 and she has accomplished more in her 28 years than most of us have. she went to extreme poverty and sought terrible things in refugee camps in iran and pakistan and at a young age, she wanted to make sure that children of afghanistan, future of this country will never have to endure what i went through. and i just want to read one thing she told me which is also on her website. she says for me is there a practical remedy for the ignorance oppression and hate rid and poverty so deeply embedded in society. raise a new generation of new boys and girls. >> a new generation. with this philosophy, these kids in poverty, they turn to extremism. they end up being the people that want to kill us and she knows that. that is why she wants to do this even more. >> it's interesting questio
airport. they say pakistan, thailand, kenya, they aren't good at sharing information. even when they have terrorist screening information they may not hav bill: they only have to be right once. peter doocy there. that hearing starts in 25 minutes. we'll monitor it, bring you updates won that starts. if you are near a computer you can watch it streaming live at foxnews.com. click on theling next to the home page. we try and make it easy for you. all the analysts we talk to, they only have to be trite once. we have to be right every single time. alisyn: the top republican in the house calling president obama out for what he called making a veiled threat. the president said he cannot guarantee the social security checks will go out august 3 if there is no deal to raise the debt ceiling by august 2. >> we don't want this to happen. we don't want stoag security recipients to wait a day any longer for their checks. but it really stroiks the importance of what it is we are doing. we made promises to ourselves and kids and grandkids can't afford. i said all year, i think this is the moment and th
, about $1 billion so far, check out my blog. cnn.com/situationroom. from pakistan, a very graphic video released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort
$800 million in military aid to pakistan right next door, because there's been some tension, obviously, since the killing of bin laden. but what happened is that panetta said, we've got to show them that this has to be a two-way street in this relationship. and they feel like this could force pakistan to stepping up to the plate and k being more aggressive in trying to take out those safe havens on the border. >> we shall see. jim miklaszewski traveling with the new secretary of defense, leon panetta. stay safe in your travels, my friend. >> reporter: okay, chuck. >>> she may have been first lady for less than three years, but what a legacy. betty ford is one of the nation's most beloved first ladies. she broke preconceived notions of that role, always speaking her mind, and after politics, she left her most well-known and lasting impact of helping get rid of the stigma associated with addiction. so who better to help us remember the former first lady of the united states than dooris kearns goodwin. nice to see you. >> thank you, chuck. >> she may be more familiar with most americans l
-qaida network was angry and frustrated by the cia campaign in the tribal areas of pakistan and achieving the objective to take senior operatives off of the battlefield and keep the group under pressure so it is difficult for operatives to plan, train and raise money. uma, it is no coincidence that we are starting an identical campaign in yemen. yemen is one of the rising threatt hubs and americans are front and center in al-awaki who i describe is leader of al-qaida 2.0. he was overlooked in a key player in the al-qaida network. why was he not taken seriously? >> one of the things i lay out in the book behind the scene was our . what i showed in interviews and phone records. al-awlaki's contact with the hijackers were evidence of a personful relationship. when he return to the pentagon in 2002 as part of the outreach to moderate muslims, it was like a thief returnns to the scene of the crime, he was contacted with three of the five hijackers on flight 577 that went in the building. >>> and one of the things that is interesting, you want people to understand that this is not simply a ques
compound that u.s. and pakistan were not on the same page. >> we will following this. reza, thanks. >>> petree watched as a gra maid landed near him. he grabbed grabbed the grenade and threw it back. it severed his right hand. this afternoon he is awarded the medal of honor for his life-saving action. barbara starr is joining us live from the pentagon. barbara, tell us more about this pretty usa young man. >> reporter: he will receive the medal of honor later today from president obama in the white house what they call acting above and beyond the call of duty. it was a very daring daylight raid that they were on. usually, these types of compound raids take place under the cover of darkness. they went in during the day after insurgents. when they got in the compound, heavy fire end. the only place to find cover was a chicken coop and where they tried to fire back from. petree, a grenade tossed to his area in the chicken coop. he picked it up, already wounded and threw it back at the insurgents. it went off in his hand and he lost his right hand. but according to other troops who wer
near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of elite army rangers race over the rugged landscape. their target is an insurgent compound. the mission is high-risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because if intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touch down and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes leroy, then a staff sergeant, and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that's when the enemy opens up with the ak-47s. leroy is hit in both legs. he is bleeding badly. but he summons the strength to lead the other ranger to cover behind a chicken coop. he radios for support. he hurls a grenade at the enemy giving cover to a third ranger who rushes to their aid. an enemy grenade explodes nearby wounding leroy's two comrades. then, a second grenade lands, this time only a few feet away. every human impulse would tell someone to turn away. every soldier is trained to seek cover. that is wha
know, in pakistan helping with bomb strikes. >> his initial reports are accurate? he's talking, as you say, about damage done by the drones. then he sends a piece of video that shows him in the company of a top al qaeda. somebody we've been looking for for a long time, and then the mother load of information. he claims he's now rendered medical services to ayman al zawahiri. correct? >> how clever he was, weaving in between two worlds, the cia and al qaeda and convincing everyone he's on their side. but ultimately, as we discover later, he's actually on al qaeda's side in this elaborate plot, an incredible lure was set up by al qaeda using their own video equipment and knowledge it was set up by al qaeda, using their own video equipment and their own knowledge of how the cia works to create something so attractive that the cia could not possibly say no to it. >> the reason that the cia found him credible, although through the jordanians, and he knew the medical history of zawahiri, and it matched the information we from his egyptian files. and now the objective becomes, let's bring him
.s. relations with pakistan are getting icier as drone attacks are intensifying following this suspension of one-third of u.s. military aide to pakistan. u.s. slammed pakistan's reluctance to fight afghan militants along its border. >>> a government accountability report released today finds the system for detecting medicaid and medicare fraud are inadequate and underused. billion of dollars and claims are paid out each year, according to the report. >>> final spacewalk of the nasa era is conducted today. two space station residents will execute the walk to retrieve a broken pump. meantime, the landing plan for the "atlantis" has changed. it will now touchdown in the predawn houring of july 21st at the kennedy space center. >>> meantime, all eyes are going to be on sergeant scott moore at the marine corps ball this november when he shows up with movie star mila kunis on his arm. he asked her to the ball on youtube. take a look. >> hey, mila. sergeant moore. you can call me scott. i just want to take a moment out of my day to ask you to the marine corps ball in november in north carolina. yours t
. four suspected u.s. drone strikes in northwestern pakistan killed at least 42 alleged militants in less than 12 hours. the attacks come at a time when relations between the united states and pakistan are especially strained. if you haven't noticed. the white house just cut $800 million in aid to pakistan's military. >> special wake-up for the crews of the shuttle at the international space station. >> ♪ rocket man i'm burning out of ♪ >> good morning, atlantis! this is elton john. we wish you much success on your mission and a huge thank you to all the men and women at nasa who worked on the shuttle for the last three decades. >> good morning, houston. elton john. he's a legend. wow. that is absolutely fantastic. >> "rocket man" is a popular wake-up song for nasa used three times before. they are taking supplies to the space station. >> i wonder if roger clemens will use that in his trial today. friends and relatives of a murder victim attacking a suspect in the courthouse hallway. things got so out of control, as you see, officers had to use tasers. the video was released after
in pakistan, i'm getting letters, they love me. they don't care about the deseptembercons. >> by the way he is a good guy. >> bill: is he a little crazy. he is a little crazy. i had to -- you know. we didn't know he was a good guy until later on when the decremplet -- decepticons. >> you removed the reason for me to go see it. >> bill: chicago they blow it up street by street when they come to reverend wright it's just gruesome. [ laughter ] >> bill: that didn't happen but -- >> one of the members of the factor said this is citizen cain if you like robots fighting in 3-d in a half hour. >> bill: fighting a lot. there is a lot of fighting. i'm one of the calmer influences. dagen mcdowell, everybody. >> you rock. >> bill: in a moment pinheads and patriots critters killing americans. what's the most dangerous animal insect to reptile in the u.s.a. we will tell you p and p after these messages. wo [crowd cheers] ♪ strike three out two down out there two down [crowd cheers] ♪ ♪ [crowd cheers] [male announcer] sometimes, coming home can be a battle in itself. our wounded warriors need every
of months we did something worthy. we had a pakistan cricket scandal, caught a politician with trousers around his ankles after getting voted in as a happy married man. every couple months five million people bought that and 12 million people read that. so the important stories have massive power that they wouldn't otherwise have had. >> obviously these techniques look very different when they're employed against ordinary people who are not celebrities, not famous athletes, not members of the royal family. you mentioned hugh grant. his phone was hacked by "news of the world." he is suinging. you had a chance encounter, and he actually taped your conversation. let me play a little of that for our viewers. >> do you think it's right the only person with a decent digital scanner these days is the government. 20 years ago we all had a gone. are you comfortable that the only people who can listen to them now are -- >> celebrities themself, you justify because they're reach? >> yeah, i mean -- >> if you don't like it, just get off the stage. you don't believe celebrities have any right to pri
for afghanistan and pakistan told us this is a very fragile, difficult time. we know that for afghanistan. as we begin to draw down, what thauz that mean for their path to peace and stability and progress? american businesses will tell you if we want them to invest there, they won't do it without the presence of american security, that's very important for our government to know. >> are american businesses really willing to invest in afghanistan? >> they are. one of the most recent projects is with kate spade. kate spade has gone into afghanistan in the last year. they surveyed what tn opportunities are there for marketable products and going te marketableable products, and afghanistan has the third largest producer of cashmere, and they want a product made by afghan women and sold in kate spade stores here and online and they are willing to invest a lot of money i might add, but they have the support of the u.s. government and the u.s. military to give them access. >> anita mcbride, what a pleasure to see you again. >> thank you so much. >>> what political stories will be making headlines in th
, but it will be this emerging theater of war on terror, somalia, yemen and still pakistan and the traditional concerns about north korea and iran. iran may prove, kyra, to be topping the list in the months and years to come. a lot of concern that the regime is getting very involved in afghanistan, in iraq, and really trying to exert its influence throughout that region. so all of this list of countries are going to be the things that petraeus will be dealing with as director petraeus one he's no longer general petraeus. >> it will be interesting to watch the difference that he makes and the changes that he makes. barbara starr from the pentagon. barbara, thanks. >> reporter: sure. >>> told is nelson mandela's birthday. he turns 93, and millions of school children around the country saying happy birthday to mandela before lessons begin today. take a listen. ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday to you ♪ happy birthday dear nelson >> how else are people celebrating mandela on this special day? >> reporter: well, it is a special day for south africans, and there was, as you could hear, quite a lot of
. what was his connection to pakistan? there are so many unanswered questions about his overseas connections and what he was really doing and his radicalization during the process in which the military did nothing. and finally, the information the joint terrorism task force had about mr. al laak can i and communications with major hasan at fort hood. why wasn't it shared with general cohen at fort hood when it could have stopped the murder of 13 soldiers? jon: a lot of questions there. let's hope you get answers. congressman, thank you. >> i appreciate it. alisyn: here's what is happening now. joint chiefs chairman admiral mike mullen giving a briefing on the wars in iraq and afghanistan and the defense department budget as the military faces questions about the mounting cost of american involvement in the libyan conflict as well. national security correspondent jennifer griffin live from the pentagon for us. jennifer, what did we learn from this briefing? >> reporter: alisyn, he didn't really speak about the libyan conflict for or the cost of it. discussion was with the pentagon
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)